On the week of March 7, 2016, "Work from Home" debuted at number 12 on the Billboard Hot 100 with 88,000 downloads sold, 10 million United States streams and 20 million radio impressions in its first week, marking the group's highest debut and equaling its best rank for "Worth It", which rose to number 12 in August 2015, twenty-three weeks after it was released.[9] The following week, the song fell four spots to number 16.[58] It would then rise three spots to number 13[59] and rise one more spot, to match its debut position for the week dated April 9, 2016.[60] The following week, the song would climb two spots to reach a peak at number 10, earning the group their first top 10 single in the United States. Subsequently, they became the first all-female group to chart in the top 10 since "When I Grow Up" by The Pussycat Dolls peaked at number nine in 2008.[11] It recorded a 6-4 jump on the Digital Songs chart selling 89,000 copies, a 34 percent increase from the previous week. The song also saw a 8-5 jump on Streaming Songs with steams of 14.4 million, a rise of 20 percent and 22-17 leap on the Radio Songs chart, retaining a 49 million audience, a 22 percent increase from the previous week.[61]
A person who telecommutes is known as a "telecommuter", "teleworker", and sometimes as a "home-sourced", or "work-at-home" employee. A telecommuter is also called a "telecommuting specialist", as a designation and in a professional context. Many telecommuters work from home, while others, sometimes called "nomad workers" work at coffee shops or other locations. The terms "telecommuting" and "telework" were coined by Jack Nilles in 1973.[11]

In this increasingly digital world, there has never been a better time to work from home. At-home jobs are the perfect opportunities for those struggling to secure a local gig, need to stay home for health reasons, have to care for a loved one, or simply don't relish the thought of dealing with a hectic commute every day. FlexJobs reported in their The State of Remote Jobs survey that, as of 2017, 43% of U.S. workers now work remotely — even if it's just a part-time side hustle to supplement their income. For remote jobs, you'll need a computer, some basic skills, and a can-do attitude. Click through this list of remote employment areas that are booming right now, plus find even more ways to make money from home.
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